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Kazim Naqvi is an associate in the Intellectual Property and Litigation Practice Groups in the firm's Century City office. He is also a member of the firm’s Trade Secrets Team.

Whether a court order is appealable is often the first issue analyzed by appellate attorneys. An interlocutory order is an order issued by a court while a case is pending. These orders are not a final disposition of the case, but some interlocutory orders may be appealed even while the litigation continues. California law generally holds that “[t]o qualify as appealable, the interlocutory order must be a final determination of a matter that is collateral—i.e., distinct and severable—from the general subject of the litigation.”[1]

Continue Reading Trade Secret Misappropriation: Denial of Motion for Attorneys’ Fees under CUTSA is Not an Appealable Order

While traditionally healthcare businesses have tended to look to patent protection, it would behoove them to also think about trade secret protection to protect their valuable inventions.  Given the financial strains on businesses from the COVID-19 pandemic, some businesses may find trade secret protection a cost-efficient alternative to the patent process. Trade secret enforcement also potentially can yield hundreds of millions, sometimes even over a billion, dollars for the trade secret holder.[1] Further, patent protection is not always available.[2]
Continue Reading Admonition To Members Of The Healthcare Industry: Don’t Give Trade Secret Protection The Short Shrift!

Companies routinely use Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs) to protect confidential information shared with potential acquirers, consultants, and other third parties.  But companies cannot merely rely on stock NDAs to protect that information.  They should understand each NDA’s procedures for designating information as “Confidential” (and ensure compliance with them), and grasp the interplay between NDAs and state trade secret laws in terms of imputing duties of confidentiality.
Continue Reading 4 Steps to More Effectively Use NDAs to Protect Confidential Information